Monday, 23 April 2012

Pedigree Dogs Exposed India, anyone?


I've been getting a bit of traffic on the blog recently from India where there is a popular dog show scene overseen by the Indian Kennel Club. 


This Neapolitan Mastiff, from the Cadabom Kennels in Bangalore, is Indian Champion Cadabom's Neomass Notorio - "Ghost". He is, apparently, the most "havily [sic] wrinkled dog in the world"; also "the most profilic", sadly, given the fervent hope that this dog would not be spreading misery to countless offspring. 

Want to see some videos? Brace yourself.





And here's a pic of their other Mastino, Ind Ch Neomass Fuimara - "Rhino". 


A few people have already let Cadabom Kennels know what they think of their Neapolitan Mastiffs on the Cadabom Facebook site.

Couldn't happen here? Well not Ghost, anyway, I hope. And things are changing here. But don't forget that the dog below qualified for and was shown at Crufts last year.



57 comments:

  1. No words...except a profound sadness for these animals and disgust with the humans for creating these freakish dogs.

    Ann Cardon

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  2. I wonder what the lifespan is for these poor miserable creatures?

    Whatever it is, it's a miserable existence. This is just tragic.

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  3. he has many other dogs on his site.. some wonderful dogs.. lovely Danes in particular..

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    1. I thought the Danes looked like they carried a lot of extra skin on their faces. Nothing like the Mastiff, of course, but compared to other Danes they seemed droopy.

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    2. oh please.. the Danes are lovely examples of the breed..especially in a country that has few real breed examples of anything... In fact I would think the blogger would be touting the health of the "street dogs' commonly found in India and telling us all to breed to that "standard' for health and fitness.

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    3. Actually India is ripe with different breeds and regional strains unseen by the rest of the world. It does not take much Google Fu to see India is home to plethora of types "rare breed" advocates would jump on if they were exported to the rest of the world.

      To say "have a few real breed examples of anything" is condescending and cultural supremacist in mentality. I guess show-fanciers have not forfeit their attitude toward colonialism yet.

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    4. Great Danes are not my breed, but even I can see that the Danes on that site are NOT "lovely examples of the breed." Danes that are predominately white are typically deaf and may have various eye anomalies. The ones on this page would be a DQ in the US. They do not meet any standard I am familiar with.

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  4. That poor dog, this is so wrong it beggars belief!! Speechless with disgust as Ann states above!

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  5. Gosh... I thought I had seen the worst Mastino ever, but he has been beaten - by a mile.
    This is beyond SICK. Poor animals.

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  6. I show dogs here in the US, and honestly, I am NOT a fan of PDE... The thing that no one seems to understand though is that it is becoming harder and harder do defend some of the people in the show world. My breed is GSD's, there are new health tests becomming available all the time. Only a handfull of breeders utilize them, which is pretty sad. There is now a test to see if a dog/bitch is a DM carrier, and an older test for the long coat gene. {even though it is easy enough to figure out on your own about the coat factor} I know several people who will still breed a stud that carries DM and people seem to not care. It is more important in some circles that a dog not carry the long coat gene. This is just not OK IMO. People who buy "just" pets would much rather have a coat than a dog with DM. Personally I will never get a GSD who isn't Dm clear. My current dog is 9 and has DM. He is from one of the top kennels in the US, is a CH and has obedience titles as well. It's aweful to watch him though. His rear is going and he will not live as long as he would have with out the DM. I'm not brave enough to put my name on this as I don't want to be black balled...

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    1. Anon 10:00 AM 04/23/12: Good for you for speaking out, even if anonymously. I hear what you are saying. I am generally not a fan of "outside" groups telling animal handlers what to do because so often people who don't know enough say things that make sense on paper but don't hold up. One example I can think of is the push to ban carriage horses. Sure some are mistreated, but when I see a fully dappled draft horse with happy ears in Central Park, who spends several months on the farm, it's tough for me to say it's "cruel." And without the carriage industry, many draft breeds would be extinct. Tough for me to answer that existential question "Would a horse rather never have lived than to have worked in Central Park?" I think there is more than a little human conceit in insisting that the answer is "Better not to have lived."

      However, I can't even watch dog shows any more because about a dozen breeds move me to tears. It's not just the obviously deformed ones, either. What is with huge, obese labradors who would never fit in a boat? Or "working" spaniels with coats dragging on the ground? It is so painfully apparent that too many breeds have become about people's ability to defy nature and create something extreme, just to say they do it. And so few of the happy, balanced breeds bred by small hobby breeders who keep their dogs as pets; or those few that are still truly dual-purpose and the show dogs go home and work too, actually make it in the Group ring. The judges just consistently reward the most outlandish dogs on a regular basis.

      Pile that onto the fact that in almost every breed that still works, the working lines are totally split from the show lines and it begins to make me question what is going on in people's heads.

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    2. I honestly cannot believe how anyone would see that poor creature as a fine example of any breed.
      I show and work my dogs. One of the main reasons I love showing is that I take pride in exhibiting a dog that is in peak fit condition and that every aspect of its make up fits for the function it was made.I have seen dogs in recent times being downgraded for being overweight and unfit, ehich I think is a very positive thing going forward. We just need more judges honest enough to put the healthier dogs up for awards and not the dog that belongs to their friend.

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    3. I recently visited the AKC dog museum in St. Louis, which includes a "Hall of Fame" that pays tribute to some extraordinary dogs.

      Amongst the dogs honored there is Rin Tin Tin, who most will know was a German Shepherd in the early 20th century who appeared in a large number of movies. A photo of him can be found at http://www.tnr.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/detail_page/rin-tin-tin-heroic-dog-movie-star.jpg

      There is a painting of him on the wall. Interestingly, it shows him with the sagging back and horribly exaggerated rear angulation that plague modern show GSD's.

      Is someone trying to re-write history here?

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    4. "The thing that no one seems to understand though is that it is becoming harder and harder do defend some of the people in the show world" Not sure that "no one" understands this. In fact, it seems to me that everyone BUT the AKC understands this.

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    5. About Rin Tin Tin, I suggest you buy the book about him. It talks about how he was bred for show, there have been 3 Tin's I do believe, and after that his line was bred into show. I feel Tin was the worst example of the GSD breed. Of course, my mother who grew up watching his innocent show, feels otherwise. I couldn't even stand reading the complete infatuation with that improper gait. The fact that the breeder/author was infatuated with faults, goes to show she was not breeding for health. She never talked about a healthy and solid gait.

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    6. Oh, never mind. I looked at the picture and he indeed did not have the sagging gait. What the heck happened?

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  7. The breeders of these poor dogs should be shut down--not rewarded with championships. These dogs all need to be neutered and operated on to remove some of their excess skin so they can see... and breath... and eat... unimpeded. These are supposed to be the proud descendants of Roman gladiator dogs??? Ha! These dogs remind me of these "10 Heaviest People in the World": http://www.oddee.com/item_98150.aspx. For one, they have skin flaps in completely unlikely and unnecessary places, and cannot walk far enough to leave whatever room they find themselves in.

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  8. This is disgusting. Even the Crufts dog. What is wrong with people!?!?!

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  9. There was a guy in China whose face looked like that. Surgeons carefully removed the growths to improve his wellbeing and return his sight.

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    1. Yes, the skill of the plastic surgeons when they work to correct deformity is beyond praise - seen what they can do for children born with a cleft palate?
      But why the intentional production of deformity for a hobby, or for money, or out of sheer obssession, should be tolerated I don´t understand. WHY aren´t breeders of such poor animals required to either have the dog put to sleep, or else pay for that rather extensice corrective surgery out of their own pockets?

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  10. There are breeders and enthusiasts in this country who think that dog is attractive, I kid you not.

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  11. This is just sick and I feel really sorry for these creatures. They are a caricature of the breed. It is revolting, I am too appalled for words.

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  12. There is another breed being promoted in Korea and other parts of Asia called the Korean Dosa. It bears a strong resemblance to the dogs pictured here so I'm wondering if they are one and the same breed.

    I happened to meet a man at a rare breed show here in the states that had imported several Dosa puppies (he had them all with him at the show) and was attempting to sell them for extremely large sums of money. It was kind of appalling to say the least.

    Dosa website here: http://www.dosadog.com/

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    1. @Stoutheartedhounds

      Woah. Those Tosa Inu are beautiful dogs, and from the looks of them, as well as the homophony of their names, look like the original working version of the Dosa probably did... That Dosa has no eyes!

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  13. Are they cutting off the video clips as soon as the poor deformed creature attempts to move so that they don't show him falling on his -- well, for the sake of argument, call it a "face?"

    I want to vomit.

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  14. What the hell is that thing?

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  15. Wickedly cruel to breed a dog like that. And if one wants a mastiff in India, why not not breed Indian Mastiffs (Bully Cuttas) ? Superb dogs, well constructed, fit , still bred as guard dogs (and in Pakistan as fighting dogs). I'm not normally a fan of mastiff breeds, but a friend in Scotland has a white Indian Mastiff, and his dog is one of the most beautiful dogs I know, lovely head, wonderful construction, bone and and muscle, easy movement, no loose skin anywhere. Insane to import this kind of Neo crap from Italy or Australia, when one can have a real functional and completely unspoilt mastiff in India. No comparison.

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  16. My husband points out that the dog looks a bit like a giant dust mite:

    http://breathe-easyductcleaning.com/images/dust_mites.jpg

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    1. Mine remarked that they look like an old saggy scrotum. :)

      Kary

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  17. Can't stop laughing - the intro page of their website (which you can get to via their Facebook link) has their mission statement front and centre " your dream of having a huge breed......ends here"

    It certainly does! People that would buy these animals would certainly have their dreams destroyed.

    We saw this with sheep breeding many years ago - that you can develop endless skin wrinkles doesn't mean you should.

    This is ALL driven by judges - if the dogs don't win they don't get bred. WHERE are the judges and WHAT are they doing??????????

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  18. The website is indeed 'no joke', there is nothing funny about it. Complete with sexy women poses, what has that to do with anything? It's clear that the principle is all about himself and I presume going dog wild on daddy's money. I sure he envisions himself as some 'rock star' of India's breeding network. To most he is a Dr. Moreau with shades. The sick never believe that are deranged. Perhaps as a result of clear suffering the dog has been subject to euthanization is the course of action..and get the dog any help it needs.

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  19. The fact that this is taking place in India is no excuse and not even an explaination. It's not about different cultural attitudes to dogs or animals in general. It's about the western concept of the pedigree show dog taken to a tragic extreme.
    Pedigree dogs have become a sort of staus symbol for the wealthy in India, China and other parts of the world that have seen a surge in their economic fortunes. Pedigree breeders in these countries see thmselves as following in our westen show traditions.
    Of course we should condemn heart-breaking exaggerations when we see them but we best serve pedigree dogs in India and elsewhere by developing a template for welfare focused dog showing here in the UK.
    Kevin Colwill

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  20. ah yes.. the "colonialist should still be telling the WOGS what to do..

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    1. Anonymous @ 0957... cheap, lazy and deliberately obtuse- although your comment did have the merit of brevity.
      I spent my student days in sharing a house with 5 guys who had Punjabi as their first language. They called me a few choice names, mainly on the five-a-side football pitch, but "colonialist" was never one of them. I wouldn’t, by the way, ever use the word you’ve used in any context.
      I mentioned the fact that pedigree dogs are being exploited as status symbols in parts of the world where this hasn't previously happened to any large degree. I think that's pretty factual. I mentioned that exploitation isn’t part of local culture but seen as following in a western, arguably British tradition...going to argue?
      The point is that we’ve exported the bogus concept of canine beauty that has lead to the breeding of sad creatures like the one pictured above. We don’t begin to rectify that by wringing our hands. We do it by giving the world the best possible template for a new health focused approach to dog showing and pedigree breeding.
      Kevin Colwill

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    2. thank you although I fear you are whistling down the wind on this blog..

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  21. Horrible, just horrible. Poor thing, blinded by excessive skin. What is WRONG with the show judges who reward these freaks. Interestingly, Ghost's owner has "Save the dogs and other animals" listed as his interests on his FB. How about starting in the own home and stop breeding freaks? It breaks my heart to think there's a wee dog soul under all that massive and blinding skin.

    /Susanna

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  22. Anonymouse of 09:57 AM, I think that you´ve got it. Except that the despiccable WOGS are people everywhere who have the peasantish notion, you know, that dogs are ordinary living creatures who help us out with a lot of tasks we can´t manage on our own, anything from working sheep to tracking missing people to providing good companionship, and who should by rights have a decent life in return. We have this funny notion, see, that we and the dogs alike are being colonialized by a minority who want to educate us into the idea that the superior use for dogs is a combat of looks. Also, we dog wogs feel that this has developed into an international racket. Even so, we´d keep our humble silence as befits the common people and not interfere with the superior lot.... if it wasn´t that some of these dogs are grotesquely deformed, and suffering from it.

    I don´t mind the Indian breeder showing off his wealth and social success by sitting astride a probably expensive motor bike, etc. I do mind his showing off money and position by breeding painful deformity in his dogs. In my opinion, he should be struck off the membership list of the KC of India, if he´s on it. So should the breeders of the DQ Basset Hound at Cruft´s. What they are doing is nothing to do with dogs.

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  23. That poor dog needs a facelift, just so it can see and won't trip over its own skin!

    I really can't understand why anyone would find that attractive.

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  24. India, China, UK, USA - all guilty of various degrees of detriment. How can top breeders of exaggeration from the west justify their degrees of detriment to that of another..bad, badder and baddest. It's all bad, can they not see that from the perspective of this dog. Why is there no defense for this breeder (used loosely) from the likes of CA. Perhaps their argument is that they are not THIS bad. When are too many wrinkles too much? When you have to ask that very question is when. The 'Ghost' is totally relevant to the mindset of some western breeders but I am sure they won't acknowledge such of course...they would never go to that extreme, they are very careful with their extremes..India take note.

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  25. I would suspect that this dog has some serious trouble breathing with a nose in such a state. The kennel should be closed down and owner charged, no deliberation necessary.

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  26. I just hope he's not in pain and is loved no matter what he looks like.he looks like he has a grait temp but just feel realy sorry for him because with all thoughs rolls and wrinkles he will get sore most prob, there is no way they should breed from this dog at all as it could pass on to the puppys if anything if he can't breath properly or breath properly I think they should send him of to a peaceful place were he can sleep in peace in no pain he looks like he's looked after wich is a good thing but they realy need to think about the future of this poor doh

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  27. It's a dog with the skin of a rhinoceros.

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    1. Hey now, lets be fair to the rhinos. I've never seen a rhino with that much skin on its face.

      LJ

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  28. i live in india and i am almost 100% sure that dog hasnt won any significant dog shows..this breeder is lying for sure..Even as a show dog , it doesnt match up..The best neos in india are surprisingly good..i have even seen some impressive athletic ones..though generally the breed is not in great condition..

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    1. Probably right. It says on the youtube page hes the #1 in the world... According to whom?

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  29. @Anon Apr 27, 2012 05:21 AM

    I hope you are correct, that would seem probable from someone apparently of this mentality as per their website and facebook page. Profit, profits, profits and marketing at any cost. Not that profits and marketing are inherently bad things. But in this case??

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  30. The Great Danes on their facebook page, some of them look like their ears were cropped with scissors. Horrible. Nice kennel sores on the doberman too. And their achievements page just looks like KC papers.

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  31. "Your dream of having a huge breed ends here!"

    Seems about right.

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  32. Isn't breeeding two harlequins Great Danes dangerous in terms of health? Am I right in thinking it creates 'Lethal Harlequins'? I am not a dog breeder so I may be wrong on that point. What I found the most shocking was how many people wanted to buy a puppy from this guy.

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  33. It is so painfully apparent that too many breeds have become about people's ability to defy nature and create something extreme,

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  34. Holy crap - that is just terrible! I feel so sad for the pooor dogs - how anyone can find that kind of skin exaggeration as desirable is a total mystery to me.

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  35. http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.145590415501104.28097.100001504395766&type=3

    Looks like our beloved Boxers are turning into frogs, just like our German Shepherds.

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  36. Jesus Christ,that poor dog. If he isn't suffering from breathing problems,he has to be overheating everyday. He can't even walk well,he just shuffles awkwardly. This dog should never be bred,ever. This just makes me want to cry.

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  37. I didn't look up the comments on this dog on FB until now, and it's just unbelievable.
    All are comments of people praising the dog, saying it's the most awesome and beautiful thing they've ever seen, and I can't help but wonder what is WRONG with them.
    http://sphotos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/37125_114524198607704_5195364_n.jpg
    That poor dog should be taken from his owners, given a huge facelift, or if that's not possible, be put down. Just so he won't have to suffer anymore. But I guess they don't have much in terms of animal welfare laws in India.

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