Wednesday, 25 January 2017

Please don't breed if they cannot breathe

14 comments:

  1. very powerful, that poor dog. Presumably she can barely run around if she's breathing like that when she's stationary :(

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  2. Can you imagine how much more labored her breathing will be during pregnancy?

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    1. I can recall how much being pregnant meant for my breathing...as an upright walking, single-bearing species with good airways....cant imagine her life as pregnant.

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  3. If that was a person, I'd think she was having an asthma attack and be calling an ambulance.

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  4. I feel very sorry for the poor dog in the video.

    I've been involved in dogs, showing and dog sports for 40 years and have never bred a single litter, even my Grand Champion conformation dogs.

    This spring, I'm breeding my elite-level male purebred agility dog to a mixed-breed flyball/disc competition dog that lives 1200 km away, in another country. Even with both dogs being fit and healthy, the bitch's owner is driving her to my house for a natural breeding, just because we don't want to breed dogs that don't have the instinct or physical ability to mate and to give birth naturally. And then 5 months after that, I'm going to do the 2400 km round-trip to get my long-nosed, athletic-bodied sport mix puppy.

    I just totally fail to see why anybody would want a brachy breed: a dog that is in constant physical distress, riddled with health problems, and unable to do all of the great stuff dogs are supposed to do, like running, jumping, hiking, swimming, catching frisbees, etc. I'm suspicious that these breeds have become popular mainly because they are so nonathletic, overweight, and incapable of much movement that modern owners are absolved from feeling guilty for ignoring the dog in favor of doing things with their friends or children.

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    1. Simple: Big eyes, high forehead and short nose = cute. We're genetically programmed to be attracted to those traits.

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    2. Wow. Yours seems like the type of reasoned approach and very thoughtful strategy that I'd like to see in folks who claim to constantly be breeding "to better the breed." Because doing a few health tests and maintaining the purebred status quo is certainly not "doing the best one can" to improve dog health and welfare while also supplying pups to eager buyers. I love the fact that you're going to the effort to breed them naturally!

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    3. What someone would see in the breed?

      They look like human babies. Big eyes, flat faces, wobbling step, "smile" on the face, etc.

      Not just that, these breeds are seen a lot on social media and their popularity is drastically rising, which means more exposure.

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    4. Yes, they have somewhat baby-like faces, etc. But many of us realize that in canids, those traits are birth defects, not endearing qualities. I hope that "many" becomes "most" and then "all" sooner rather than later.

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    5. SKY, those puppies sound amazing! I love small sport mixes. you didn't say which breeds make up the female, but now I'm imagining pups that are gonna be a bit bigger than a pap and very athletic. Sing me up :)

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  5. Merrie, I forgot to mention that both dogs have undergone or are in the process of undergoing all their health tests, too. My male is a Papillon, and he just passed all his OFA tests and is on the CHIC registry in North America. OFA is a registry for dogs that have had any of about 100 specialist tests, normally from a board-certified vet at a veterinary university. Those are pass/fail. CHIC is a related registry that uses the OFA results to determine the most important tests for each breed. A dog that has all the CHIC-recommended tests, whether they pass or fail, gets on the CHIC registry for at least having been concerned enough to do the tests. I would only use my dog for breeding if he was both CHIC and actually passed all the tests on the OFA end, which he has. The bitch is being tested in a few weeks. Both dogs also compete at high levels in multiple sports.

    I've been into purebreds, conformation showing (among many sports) and purebred rescue for decades. But I have to thank PDE 100% for my decision that my next puppy and only breeding of my life is going to be this planned, health-tested breeding that will result in puppies that are a 50/25/25 mix of three breeds. Thanks, Jemima!

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  6. God! This is dog rape! The poor dog obviously DOES NOT WANT this human fiddling with her sex organs!

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  7. Jesus. Now I bet you she's KC registered and a breeder they promote. These dogs shouldn't be bred, we need more regulation. On the other hand am I the only one worried that the woman isn't trained to do that, she didn't look or sound like a vet, I'm scared for that dogs safty

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