Sunday, 14 November 2010

"A good example of the breed"

A Neapolitan Mastiff at Discover Dogs yesterday - a big winner in the showring. Can you imagine what it would be like to carry around all that pointless excess flesh on your face? No wonder the wretched thing is having to rest its head.

Mastino owners make great play of how depictions of these dogs can be found on Roman murals as if that somehow bequeaths them some gravitas. But of course the Roman molossus was nothing like this wrinkled.

The Neapolitan Mastiff today is, quite simply, a disgrace. Do not buy one. Ever. You are perpetuating misery.

21 comments:

  1. Good grief! The poor creature looks almost like a Shar Pei.

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  2. "No wonder the wretched thing is having to rest its head."

    Sigh.

    Really?

    No other dog breed ever lays it's head down? Ever?

    If you want these issues to be taken seriously, then I respectfully suggest not lapsing into hyperbole like that.

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  3. K,
    do you think it is acceptable for dogs like this to carry excess skin?
    This leads to skin problems, eye problems, over heating problems. I think your missing the point here

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  4. No Kate not at all. But to link excess skin to having to lay it's head down is... well, I'm too polite to write exactly what it is.

    Kate, do you honestly think the dog is laying it's head down due to excess skin? That any dog that lays it's head down has some problem associated with breeding? OF COURSE NOT.

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  5. "That any dog that lays it's head down has some problem associated with breeding? OF COURSE NOT."
    If it's because the dog carries way too much skin, enough to cause it to get hot and tired....then yes it is to do with breeding.

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  6. K - Jemima never claimed that "all" dogs that lay with their heads on their paws have problems. She's writing about this dog from this breed. Actually, I wouldn't be at all surprised if all that skin had something to do with this dog laying its head on its paws this way - to take some of that weight off. All that skin pulls down on the eyes which would aggravate the dog's (conformational and genetic)entropion. Without seeing the dog with its head up makes it impossible to guess whether it's had a facelift - yet.

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  7. Aren't there any of the old athletic-type Neo's still around? I saw one in the 70s that I still recall as one of the most magnificent dogs I'd ever seen: very active, responsive to command, no noticeably loose skin and a strong prey drive. This was in the city, so they the prey drive was directed against cats and squirrels.

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  8. Miki - now that (entropion) is a REAL issue with certain breeds - as is infections in the skin folds. Real issues, I have no problem with. But snark, in this type of blog, comes across more as pointing-and-laughing, not something one expects in a blog supposedly devoted to improving dog breeds.

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  9. You honestly think I was laughing at the Mastino's wrinkles?

    They make me weep.

    I believe and hope that by drawing attention to the problems that things will change. That is the express purpose of this blog - along with praising good decisions and progress when it happens.

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  10. Drawing attention to the problems - but all you drew attention to was the fact the "wretched thing" had to lay it's head down.

    You ignored the real issues with wrinkled, excessively "skinned" breeds. You only examined these in your follow up post.

    Why? Why two posts? Why not address the real issues in the original post, rather than simply posting "snark"?

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  11. K, how is it possible that you can look at that dog´s face and not see there is a real issue looking back at you, big time?

    Jemima, there are too few of you. I´m glad you´re around!

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  12. Bodil, and everyone else - please, go read what I actually posted. I never said there wasn't a problem. I took issue with the original post MAKING LIGHT OF THE REAL ISSUES.

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  13. K - couldn´t agree less. Where´s the making light of which you seem to see, while no one else does?
    There is a picture of a disfigured animal - a genetically disfigured animal - and a compassionate comment.
    Is it necessary to specifically spell out that the massive excess of folded skin must cause discomfort?

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  14. Bodil - it's quite clear:

    "No wonder the wretched thing is having to rest its head."

    No other point is made about the "disfigurement" and the real issues it may face. Only that it's head is so heavy it has to lay it down.

    Which every dog does.

    Which every animal that I can think of does.

    And yes, if there was any proof that dog was laying down because of an excessively heavy head, that it was generally unable to support it's own head, that it couldn't walk, run, play, live a physically normal existence due to it's excessively heavy head - then the comment was warranted.

    But it's simply a photo of a dog laying down.

    If that is the sum total of the issues resulting from excess skin, then it's not a problem, is it?

    And of course, there are issues. Real issues. Real medical, health-affecting issues.

    None of which were mentioned. None. Not one. Nowhere (except in a follow-up post, after they were raised in the comments here).

    And oddly enough, I've never heard any criticisms about breeds like this having any issues (such as neck strain, skeletal issues, etc.) from excessive head weight. Entropian, skin infections - yes. Heavy head issues? Nope. Never. In any breed. So it's NOT a real issue, and yet was the only one pointed out here.

    This is supposedly a blog to improve dog breeding. So do it by addressing the REAL issues, not by snarking at a picture of a dog laying down like all normal dogs do.

    Talk about real issues facing the breeds, not subjective opinions based on a photo that only shows normal dog behaviour.

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  15. Did you think I posted the pic to "snark" or to make the point that this dog has had very abnormal morphology foisted on it by breeders oblivious to the welfare cost? You know and I know that it was the latter, so I don't think there any point in further labouring this point? New points are of course welcome, though.

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  16. I have this dog for 5 years. He has no problems with it. It seems he get used to it.

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  17. The point is that he shouldn't have to.

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  18. these dogs with all the excess skin around there eyes are in greater risk of getting cherry eyed,the weight of all that excess skin pulls down the bottom of there eye lids then there tear ducts are exposed and surgery is the only way to fix it ,thats the price the breed pays for selective breeding,look at what they did to the bulldog,there snout is to short to cool down the hot air then they over heat,there thinking of ,useing the same selective breeding to make there snout bigger again,they should of left all these breeds to develope natrualy,

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  19. Bump this topic

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  20. Don't blame the dog blame the breeder.
    Blame the show Ring, blame crufts and Blame the god forsaken Kennel Club

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  21. I LOVE mastiff's. Especially the Neo Mastiff. :) So absolutely adorable. A disgrace? I think not. One of the best protection dogs around, very loyal and friendly..

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